The mineral clouds on the extrasolar giant gas planets HD 209458b and HD 189733b

The giant gas planets HD 189733b and HD 209458b are the two most studied extrasolar planets today. Both have been observed by several research groups with varies telescopes including the Hubble and the Spitzer Space Telescopes, and the super-high-precision HARPS spectrograph mounted on the 3.6 m telescope in La Silla in Chile. These extensive observational programs have reviled details about the atmospheres of these planets, like for example the presence of CO and CH4 in HD 189733b and CO and H2O in HD 209458b. Observations have further established that both gas giants form clouds inside their atmospheres (e.g. Sing et al. 2016). Are these clouds similar to clouds on Earth? What are they made of? Why does HD 209458b seem to have more water vapour than HD 189733b? How different are clouds between the two planets?

We use results from 3D radiative-hydrodynamics simulations of the atmospheres of HD 189733b and HD 209458b to answer the above questions and to derive cloud characteristics. We apply the same ideas about cloud formation as described in our Drift-Phoenix post. First, condensation seeds form with a certain efficiency. Once they are present, many solid materials (e.g. MgSiO3[s], Fe[s], SiO[s], TiO2[s], [s] meaning solid phase) can condense on these numerous but small surfaces. As these cloud particles grow, they fall into the atmosphere (gravitational settling). These raining cloud particles will encounter changing ambient conditions because the gas temperature and the gas pressure increase inwards the atmosphere. On their way, the cloud particles change in size but also in composition.

We now probe the atmospheric cloud formation in HD 189733b and HD 209458b by calculating the cloud structure for the vertical atmosphere at different longitudes and latitudes shown on Fig. 1.

Figure1. Points in the atmosphere where cloud formation was probed

Figure 1. Points in the atmosphere where cloud formation was probed

We find that both planets have the smallest cloud particles near the top of the cloud and the largest cloud particles at the bottom of the cloud, which is far inside the atmosphere beyond observable heights. This can be seen from the black solid line in all the panels in Fig 2.

Figure 2 demonstrates the vertical cloud structures for the daysides of the giant gas planets HD 189733b (top) and HD 209458b (bottom). We show how the material composition changes with height for different latitudes (Φ=270°, 315°, 0°, 45°, 90°) along the equator. The material composition is visualized by the lines of different colours, representing one material each: TiO2[s] – solid dark blue, Al2O3[s] – solid blue, CaTiO2[s] – solid purple, Fe2O3[s] – dashed light green, Fe[s] – dotted green, SiO[s] – dashed brown, SiO2[s] – solid brown, MgO[s] – dashed dirty orange, MgSiO3[s] – dashed orange, Mg2SiO4[s] – solid orange. The contribution of the different materials to the volume of the cloud particles, Vs/Vtot, is shown in percentage. For example, VMg2SiO4/Vtot=0.3 means 30% of the cloud particle is made of Mg2SiO4.

Figure 2. Dayside cloud particle material composition (colour coded, left axis) and mean grain sizes (black, right axis) for both exoplanets. For colour codes refer to the original paper at Helling et al. 2016, fig. 7 , or to the text above

Figure 2. Dayside cloud particle material composition (colour coded, left axis) and mean grain sizes (black, right axis) for both exoplanets. For colour codes refer to the original paper at Helling et al. 2016, fig. 7, or to the text above

To the left in Fig. 2, where the gas pressure is low, is the upper part of the atmosphere and the cloud. Here, the cloud particles are small (10-2 μm) and made of a rich mix of materials indicated by many coloured lines appearing in the plots of Fig 2. Letting your eyes wonder more to the right shows that most of the lines disappear, because these materials evaporate (like Fe2O3[s], MgO[s]). Most of the cloud particles are now made of MgSiO3[s], Mg2SiO4[s], SiO2[s] and a bit of Fe[s]. When moving further inwards the atmosphere where the temperature increases beyond thermal stability of the silicate materials, a larger fraction of cloud particles will be made of Fe[s].

Inspecting Fig 2 a bit closer by comparing the results for HD 189733b and HD 209458b shows that the cloud particles at the inner rim of HD 189733b are more Fe[s] rich than for HD 209458b. The cloud particles in the upper atmospheric regions appear rather similar in material composition: they are made of silicates and oxides with only very small contribution form iron.

A major result of our work is that all cloud properties are interlinked and that it is extremely difficult to guess correct combinations of cloud particle-sizes and their material composition that will occur at a certain place inside the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet.

Why would HD 209458b show more water absorption than HD 189733b? Hence, why does HD 209458b seem to have more water vapour than HD 189733b according to observations? Water is the most abundant absorbing species in the gas phase and maybe one would not expect any differences between two relatively similar planets like HD 189733b and HD 209458b. However, our research shows that a considerably larger portion of the atmosphere of HD 209458b is affected by the cloud than for HD 189733b. The clouds in HD 209458b reach into regions of lower atmospheric pressure, hence lower gas densities, compared to HD 189733b. It should therefore be more difficult to observe water on HD 209458b than on HD 189733b. Therefore, the more a cloud layer extends into the low-density upper part of the atmosphere, the shallower the gas-absorption features will be in the observed spectrum (Fig. 3).

Figure 3. More water molecules accumulate above clouds at higher atmospheric pressure. Clouds on HD 209458b form lower in the atmosphere (right), therefore have more water molecules above them resulting in a deeper water absorption feature in the spectrum, than on HD 189733b (left)

Figure 3. More water molecules accumulate above clouds at higher atmospheric pressure. Clouds on HD 209458b form lower in the atmosphere (right), therefore have more water molecules above them resulting in a deeper water absorption feature in the spectrum, than on HD 189733b (left)

 

For more details check out the original paper on ADS:

 Ch. Helling, G. Lee, I. Dobbs-Dixon, et al. 2016, MNRAS, 460, 855

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3 thoughts on “The mineral clouds on the extrasolar giant gas planets HD 209458b and HD 189733b

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